Trust, But Ask Why

To establish trust, it’s critical to understand why your client asked the question.

In today’s world of information overload, there’s an adage
from President Ronald Reagan that seems especially relevant. He used to ask his
team to “trust, but verify.”

With so much readily available information, we need to
determine what we can trust.

Whenever I read an article or listen to a podcast I first think, “Can I trust this information for myself? And can I trust it for my practice?” And then I go a step further: “Can I trust the information from my clients? And how to I validate that information?” Not only do you have to trust, but verify – you also need to trust, but ask why.

“You need to do more than verify the information. To succeed, you need to really get granular about why it’s entered the decision-making process.”

As a student basketball manager at Indiana University, I learned the value of being
prepared and asking why. Together, the student managers would supply Coach
Knight and his staff about an inch worth of paper after every practice and
every game.

Think about all that data. Who made or missed shots? How
many assists did each player have? We had sets of data broken down by different
types of coverage and about anything that could be thrown at a college
basketball team. We had 165 practices, all with different stats. And it was all
before mobile technology, all on pen and paper.

Coach Knight trusted us to get the data right. Then, he would
digest it all and figure out why certain plays worked. For example: “Why did we
actually score three consecutive times with lay ups against this particular
set?” Then he would watch the videotapes for every practice and game –
verifying the information. He made the decision that I’ll challenge you with:
Be determined to understand the why, all the time.

“Be determined to understand the why, all the time.”

When you’re dealing with clients, you need to do more than
verify the information. To succeed, you need to really get granular about why
it’s entered the decision-making process.

Always ask:

• Why is that important?
• Why are we talking about this specific issue?
• What’s the background?

Today, clients are more well-educated than ever. They have access to any amount of information at any time. The ability to transfer that information from just numbers to actual meaningful data and wisdom is what is going to separate you and your business going forward.

Transformational Tactic

Ask your clients a simple question, then trust, but ask why. 

If you would like more information on how to transform your business to a high performing practice, please subscribe to the blog by texting the word PERFORMANCE to 72345.